Song of Scheherazade

Song of Scheherazade1947 Theatrical PosterDirected by Walter Reisch Produced by Edward Kaufman Edward Dodds Written by Walter Reisch Starring Yvonne De Carlo Jean-Pierre Aumont Eve Arden Brian Donlevy Charles Kullman (as Charles Kullmann) Elena Verdugo Phillip Reed John Qualen George Dolenz Music by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Miklós Rózsa Cinematography Hal Mohr William V. Skall Edited by Frank GrossProduction company Universal International PicturesDistributed by Universal International PicturesRelease dates 1947 (1947)Country United States Language English Box office $2.1 million (US rentals)[1] 2,802,722 admissions (France)[2] Song of Scheherazade is a 1947 American musical film directed by Walter Reisch. It tells the story of an imaginary episode in the life of the Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (Jean-Pierre Aumont), in 1865, when he was a young naval officer on shore leave in Morocco. It also features Yvonne De Carlo as a Spanish dancer named Cara de Talavera, Eve Arden as her mother, and Brian Donlevy as the ship’s captain. Charles Kullman (credited as Charles Kullmann), a tenor with the Metropolitan Opera, plays the ship’s doctor, Klin, who sings two of Rimsky-Korsakov’s melodies.Contents 1 Plot 2 Soundtrack and choreography 3 Cast 4 Production 5 Release 6 References 7 External linksPlot[edit] Rimsky-Korsakov, a midshipman in the Imperial Russian Navy, secretly yearns to be a composer, but naval regulations prevent him from doing so. He uses a stopover in Tangiers to work on his next composition, Scheherazade (which is actually a symphonic suite but in the film is a ballet), with the tacit support of his captain. There he meets Cara de Talavera and her mother, and romantic events and complications ensue. He has to leave to return home to Russia, where his ballet is staged, but Cara unexpectedly turns up as one of the dancers, and they are reunited.[3][4] Soundtrack and choreography[edit] The film contains much colourful music and dancing. The choreography was by Tilly Losch. Rimsky-Korsakov’s music was orchestrated by Miklós Rózsa and (uncredited) Eugene Zador. Themes by Rimsky-Korsakov that are used include: “Song of India” from Sadko (sung by Charles Kullman); Flight of the Bumblebee from The Tale of Tsar Saltan; “Hymn to the Sun” from The Golden Cockerel; Capriccio Espagnol, and Scheherazade.[5] Cast[edit]Jean-Pierre Aumont – Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Yvonne De Ca. thanks wikipedia.

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Wang Anshi

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Wang (王). Wang Anshi Duke of Jing (Jīngguógōng) 荊國公[1]Chancellor of Song Dynasty In Office 1070-1074;1075–1076 Monarch Emperor ShenzongBorn (1021-12-08)8 December 1021 Linchuan, Song Died 21 May 1086(1086-05-21) (aged 64) JiangningFull name Family name: Wáng 王 Given name: Ānshí 安石 Courtesy name: Jièfǔ 介甫 Pseudonym: Bànshān Lǎorén 半山老人 Posthumous name Wén 文[2]Father Wang Yi Wang Anshi Chinese 王安石Transcriptions Standard Mandarin Hanyu Pinyin Wáng Ānshí Wade–Giles Wang2 An1-shih2[3] IPA [u̯ǎŋ ánʂɨ̌] Gwoyeu Romatzyh Wang Anshyr Yue: Cantonese Jyutping Wong4 On1-sek6 Yale Romanization Wòhng Ōn-sehk Southern Min Tâi-lô Ông An-tsio̍h (col.) Ông An-se̍k (lit.) Middle Chinese Middle Chinese hüang ʔan-d͡ʒjakWang Anshi ([u̯ǎŋ ánʂɨ̌]; Chinese: 王安石; December 8, 1021 – May 21, 1086) was a Chinese economist, statesman, chancellor and poet of the Song Dynasty who attempted major and controversial socioeconomic reforms known as the New Policies.[4][5] These reforms constituted the core concepts of the Song-Dynasty Reformists, in contrast to their rivals, the Conservatives, led by the Chancellor Sima Guang. His economic reforms included increase currency circulation, breaking up of private monopolies, and early forms of government regulation and social welfare. His military reforms expanded the use of local militias and his government reforms expanded the civil service examination system and attempted to suppress nepotism in government. Although successful for a while, he eventually fell out of favor of the emperor.Contents 1 Background 2 Early career 3 Major reform 4 Wang’s downfall 5 Poet 6 Poems 7 Legacy 8 Works cited 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksBackground[edit] During the Song Dynasty, the unprecedented development of large estates, whose owners managed to evade paying their share of taxes, resulted in an increasingly heavy burden of taxation on commoners. The drop in state revenues, a succession of budget deficits, and widespread inflation prompted the Emperor Shenzong of Song to seek advice from Wang. Early career[edit] Wang Anshi came from a family of imperial scholars (進士 Jìnshì) and was placed fourth in the imperial exam of 1042. He spent the first twenty years of his career in t. thanks wikipedia.

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BRCA1

BRCA1 Available structures PDB Ortholog search: PDBe RCSBList of PDB id codes1JM7, 1JNX, 1N5O, 1OQA, 1T15, 1T29, 1T2U, 1T2V, 1Y98, 2ING, 3COJ, 3K0H, 3K0K, 3K15, 3K16, 3PXA, 3PXB, 3PXC, 3PXD, 3PXE, 4IFI, 4IGK, 4JLU, 4OFB, 4U4A, 4Y18, 4Y2GIdentifiers Aliases BRCA1, breast cancer 1, early onset, BRCAI, BRCC1, BROVCA1, IRIS, PNCA4, PPP1R53, PSCP, RNF53, FANCS, breast cancer 1 External IDs OMIM: 113705 MGI: 104537 HomoloGene: 5276 GeneCards: 672Gene ontology Molecular function• tubulin binding • transcription regulatory region DNA binding • metal ion binding • enzyme binding • zinc ion binding • chromatin binding • damaged DNA binding • protein binding • DNA binding • transcription coactivator activity • ubiquitin-protein transferase activity • ligase activity • androgen receptor binding • RNA binding • ubiquitin protein ligase bindingCellular component• cytoplasm • BRCA1-BARD1 complex • condensed nuclear chromosome • gamma-tubulin ring complex • nucleus • BRCA1-A complex • ubiquitin ligase complex • plasma membrane • chromosome • nucleoplasm • protein complex • mitochondrial matrix • intracellular ribonucleoprotein complex • condensed chromosomeBiological process• response to ionizing radiation • centrosome cycle • chromosome segregation • regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter • response to organic substance • cellular response to DNA damage stimulus • DNA replication • response to lipid • protein K6-linked ubiquitination • intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in response to DNA damage • cell cycle • double-strand break repair via nonhomologous end joining • chromosome breakage • apoptotic process • regulation of apoptotic process • regulation of gene expression by genetic imprinting • regulation of transcription, DNA-templated • positive regulation of protein import into nucleus, translocation • negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthetic process • positive regulation of histone H3-K9 acetylation • post-translational protein modification • G2 DNA damage checkpoint • protein sumoylation • transcription, DNA-templated • positive regulation of transcription, DNA-templated • regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase III promoter • fatty acid biosynthetic process • positive regulation of histone H3-K4 methylation • double-strand break repair via homologous recom. thanks wikipedia.

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Wu Chuanyu

For the martial arts teacher, see Wu Ch’uan-yu. This is a Chinese name; the family name is Wu. Wu Chuanyu (simplified Chinese: 吴传玉; traditional Chinese: 吳傳玉; pinyin: Wú Chuányù) (August 21, 1928 – October 29, 1954) was an Indonesian-born Chinese swimmer who competed in the Olympic Games in 1948 and 1952.[1] In his second Games, he became the first competitor for the People’s Republic of China in Olympic history. Biography[edit] He was born in Salatiga, Central Java, Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) on August 21, 1928, the son of immigrants from Fujian, a coastal province of southeastern China. He swam from an early age, playing as a child on the riverside of Surakarta. In 1941, at the age of 13, he performed beyond all expectations at an important swimming competition in Indonesia, setting a new Indonesian record for the 200 metre butterfly and beating the Dutch champion.[2] Wu was one of the 26 competitors—and the lone swimmer—representing the Republic of China at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. Wu swam in the heats of the men’s 100 metre freestyle, finishing fifth in his heat with the 32nd fastest time overall (1:03.5).[3] In the fall of 1951, at the age of 23, Wu represented Indonesia at the 3rd World Festival of Youth and Students in East Berlin, winning a silver medal in the 100 metre backstroke, with a time of 1:12.8.[2] At the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Wu was part of the 40-member delegation from the People’s Republic of China. The government decided to send the Olympic team only one day prior to the opening ceremonies, and the basketball and football teams arrived too late to compete, making Wu the only competitor for China at those Games.[4] Wu swam in the heats of the men’s 100 metre backstroke on July 30, and finished fifth in his heat with the 28th fastest time overall (1:12.3).[5] In August 1953, Wu competed at the 4th World Festival of Youth and Students in Bucharest, Romania. He won the 100 metre backstroke with a time of 1:06.4. His victory was so unexpected that the swimming organizers did not have a recording of the Chinese national anthem and had to borrow one from the athletics organizers. This medal ceremony was the first time that the flag of the People’s Republic of China was raised at an international sporting event.[2] In 1954, Wu and the entire Chinese swimming team was sent to Budapest, Hungary to receive training. While in Budapest, Wu attended the 12th World Student Games. Death[edit] He returned. thanks wikipedia.

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Henry Bevan

Ven. Henry Edward James Bevan FRSL[1] (14 May 1854 – 11 July 1935) was an English Anglican divine.[2] Bevan was born in Shrewsbury, son of Henry Bevan,[3] and educated at the Shrewsbury School. He earned a B.A. in 1878 from St John’s College, Cambridge, and an M.A. in 1883 from Ely Theological College. He became curate at St Lawrence Jewry for five years (1878–83), and Camden Lecturer there. In 1878, he was ordained as a deacon, and as a priest in 1879.[4] He became the first[3] vicar of St. Andrew’s Stoke Newington and Gresham Professor of Divinity in 1888, succeeding John Burgon in the Gresham Professorship, which he held until 1904. In 1895 he became rector of Holy Trinity Sloane Street, and in 1902 he moved from there to St Luke Old Street, where he was also rector. He was Archdeacon of Middlesex from 1903 to 1930.[2][5][6][7] He also became in 1903 chaplain to the 1st Middlesex Royal Engineers Volunteers,[3] later redesignated the 2nd London Divisional Royal Engineers of the Territorial Army.[7] From 1894 to 1930 he was Examining Chaplain to the Bishop of London,[4] serving three incumbent bishops – Frederick Temple (about whom Bevan authored a memoir of Temple’s period in London, published 1906),[4] Mandell Creighton and Arthur Winnington-Ingram. Through his mother, Bevan was the grand-nephew of John Smalman, the builder of Quatford Castle in Shropshire, which later became his own country residence when he inherited it in 1889.[3][7][8] In 1883 he married Charlotte, the second daughter of the 8th Viscount Molesworth.[7] John Ireland’s Te Deum in F is dedicated to Bevan.[9] References[edit] ^ Listed as FRSL in his publication “The Religion and Philosophy of Thomas Carlyle”, Trans. Roy. Soc. Lit. XXVI 211–230, 1905. ^ a b The Cambridge yearbook and directory, S. Sonnenschein & Co., 1906, p. 58 . ^ a b c d Mate, C.H. (1907). Shropshire, Historical Descriptive and Biographical, Volume II – Biographical. p. 28.  ^ a b c Crockford’s Clerical Directory, 1935. Crockford’s. p. 104.  ^ “Our Chronicle”, The Eagle (St John’s College, Cambridge) 15, p. 390, 1889 . ^ “Our Chronicle”, The Eagle (St John’s College, Cambridge) 25, p. 214, 1904 . ^ a b c d Henry Robert Addison; Charles Henry Oakes; William John Lawson; Douglas Brooke Wheelton Sladen (1901), Who’s who, Volume 53, A. & C. Black, pp. 157–158 . ^ Shropshire Archaeological and Natural History Society (Great Britain) (1902), “Sequ. thanks wikipedia.

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Patrick Mullen

Patrick Mullen is the name of:Patrick Mullen (ice hockey) (born 1986), American ice hockey player Patrick Mullen (Medal of Honor) (1844–1897), member of the United States NavySee also[edit]Pat Mullin (1917–1999), baseball player Patrick Mullins (disambiguation) This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. thanks wikipedia.

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Kertomesis stesichora

Kertomesis stesichora Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Order: Lepidoptera Family: Autostichidae Genus: Kertomesis Species: K. stesichora Binomial name Kertomesis stesichora (Meyrick, 1911) Synonyms Paradoris stesichora Meyrick, 1911Kertomesis stesichora is a moth in the Autostichidae family. It was described by Meyrick in 1911. It is found in India.[1] The wingspan is 11-13 mm. The forewings are whitish-ochreous tinged with rosy-pink, with some scattered fuscous and dark fuscous scales. There is a small blackish spot on the base of the costa, and one on the dorsum near the base. The stigmata are blackish, the first discal forming a small round spot, the plical dot-like, beneath it, the second discal absorbed in a transverse blotch from the dorsum. There is a small blackish spot on the costa slightly beyond this, in one specimen little marked and there are some cloudy undefined blackish dots around the apex and upper part of the termen. The hindwings are grey.[2] References[edit] ^ funet ^ J. Bombay nat. Hist. Soc. 20 (3): 735 This article relating to the Gelechioidea superfamily is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e. thanks wikipedia.

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Crowden railway station

CrowdenLooking west in September 2009Location Place Crowden Area High Peak Coordinates 53°29′29″N 1°52′26″W / 53.4914°N 1.8740°W / 53.4914; -1.8740Coordinates: 53°29′29″N 1°52′26″W / 53.4914°N 1.8740°W / 53.4914; -1.8740 Grid reference SK083994 Operations Original company Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway Pre-grouping Great Central Railway Post-grouping London and North Eastern Railway History 1 July 1861 (1861-07-01) Station opened 4 February 1957 (1957-02-04) Station closed Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom Closed railway stations in Britain A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–ZUK Railways portal Crowden railway station is a closed railway station on the Woodhead Line between Manchester and Sheffield, that served the hamlet of Crowden, Derbyshire between 1861 and 1957. History[edit] The section of the Sheffield, Ashton-under-Lyne and Manchester Railway (SA&MR) between Dinting (then known as Glossop) and Woodhead opened to public traffic on 8 August 1844, but initially there was no station between Hadfield and Woodhead.[1] At the start of 1847, the SA&MR amalgamated with other companies to form the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR).[2] On 1 August 1897 the MS&LR was renamed the Great Central Railway and this was merged with other railways to form the London and North Eastern Railway on 1 January 1923. A local millowner, Brown & Co., donated £50 towards the cost of providing a station at Crowden; plans were drawn up in April 1857, but the MS&LR decided that the sum of £400 was too much and dropped the idea; however, they did not return the donation, and when Brown & Co. complained in May 1860 about their loss, the plan was revived, and the station was built, the MS&LR meeting the balance of the £450 total cost. George Benton of Glossop was contracted for the building work, but the necessary road improvements were provided by Manchester Corporation,[3] the station being adjacent to the dam at the lower end of the Woodhead Reservoir, which belonged to Manchester Corporation. The station was opened on 1 July 1861.[4] The station was closed on 4 February 1957[4] but passenger trains continued to pass through the station until January 1970 and the line was closed completely in July 1981. References[edit] ^ Dow, George (1959). Great Central, Volume One:. thanks wikipedia.

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2016 Nippon Professional Baseball season

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) This article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject. Please help improve the article with a good introductory style. (June 2015)This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)(Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article is about the 2016 Nippon Professional Baseball season only. For information on all of baseball, see 2016 in baseball.2016 NPB season League Nippon Professional Baseball Sport Baseball Duration March 25, 2016 – September 28, 2016 Central League Pennant Pacific League Pennant Climax Series Japan Series   Runners-up [ NPB seasons← 2015 2017 →The 2016 Nippon Professional Baseball season is the 67th season since the NPB was reorganized in 1950.Contents 1 Incidents 2 Regular season standings 3 Climax Series3.1 First stage3.1.1 Central League 3.1.2 Pacific League 3.2 Final stage3.2.1 Central League 3.2.2 Pacific League 4 Japan Series 5 League leaders [3]5.1 Central League 5.2 Pacific League 6 ReferencesIncidents[edit] A gambling scandal involving members of the Yomiuri Giants was reported in October. Pitchers Satoshi Fukuda, Shoki Kasahara, and Ryuya Matsumoto were found to have bet on both NPB games and Major League Baseball games, as well as high school baseball.[1][2] Regular season standings[edit]Central League regular season standingsTeam G W L T Pct. GB Tokyo Yakult Swallows Yomiuri Giants Hanshin Tigers Hiroshima Toyo Carp Chunichi Dragons Yokohama DeNA BayStarsPacific League regular season standingsTeam G W L T Pct. GB Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters Chiba Lotte Marines Saitama Seibu Lions Orix Buffaloes Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles Climax Series[edit] Note: In each league’s stepladder playoff system (Climax Series), all games in that series are held at the higher seed’s home stadium. The team with the higher regular-season standing also advanced if the round ended in a tie.   First stage  . thanks wikipedia.

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Dainville-Bertheléville

Dainville-BerthelévilleDainville-BerthelévilleLocation within Lorraine region Dainville-BerthelévilleCoordinates: 48°26′30″N 5°30′37″E / 48.4417°N 5.5103°E / 48.4417; 5.5103Coordinates: 48°26′30″N 5°30′37″E / 48.4417°N 5.5103°E / 48.4417; 5.5103 Country France Region Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine Department Meuse Arrondissement Arrondissement of Commercy Canton Canton of Gondrecourt-le-Château Government  • Mayor (2008–2014) André Courtois Area1 40.3 km2 (15.6 sq mi) Population (1999)2 139  • Density 3.4/km2 (8.9/sq mi) Time zone CET (UTC+1)  • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2) INSEE/Postal code 55142 / 55130 Elevation 302–441 m (991–1,447 ft) (avg. 350 m or 1,150 ft)1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Dainville-Bertheléville is a commune in the Meuse department in Lorraine in north-eastern France. See also[edit]Communes of the Meuse department Wikimedia Commons has media related to Dainville-Bertheléville. v t e Communes of the Meuse departmentAbainville Abaucourt-Hautecourt Aincreville Amanty Ambly-sur-Meuse Amel-sur-l’Étang Ancemont Ancerville Andernay Apremont-la-Forêt Arrancy-sur-Crusne Aubréville Aulnois-en-Perthois Autrécourt-sur-Aire Autréville-Saint-Lambert Avillers-Sainte-Croix Avioth Avocourt Azannes-et-Soumazannes Baâlon Badonvilliers-Gérauvilliers Bannoncourt Bantheville Bar-le-Duc Baudignécourt Baudonvilliers Baudrémont Baulny Bazeilles-sur-Othain Bazincourt-sur-Saulx Beauclair Beaufort-en-Argonne Beaulieu-en-Argonne Beaumont-en-Verdunois Beausite Behonne Belleray Belleville-sur-Meuse Belrain Belrupt-en-Verdunois Beney-en-Woëvre Béthelainville Béthincourt Beurey-sur-Saulx Bezonvaux Biencourt-sur-Orge Billy-sous-Mangiennes Bislée Blanzée Boinville-en-Woëvre Boncourt-sur-Meuse Bonnet Bonzée Le Bouchon-sur-Saulx Bouconville-sur-Madt Bouligny Bouquemont Boureuilles Bovée-sur-Barboure Boviolles Brabant-en-Argonne Brabant-le-Roi Brabant-sur-Meuse Brandeville Braquis Bras-sur-Meuse Brauvilliers Bréhéville Breux Brieulles-sur-Meuse Brillon-en-Barrois Brixey-aux-Chanoines Br. thanks wikipedia.

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